1. Being in space destroys astronauts red blood cells, new study shows  TweakTown
  2. We don’t know why, but being in space causes us to destroy our blood  Ars Technica
  3. Why do astronauts get "space anemia"? This study has an answer.  CBS News
  4. Astronauts suffer from anemia in space because their bodies destroy a MILLION more red blood cells  Daily Mail
  5. Anemia in astronauts could be a challenge for space missions  Reuters
  6. View Full coverage on Google News
Astronauts experience anemia as a direct result of being in space, destroying 54% more red blood cells than they would on Earth.Astronauts experience anemia as a direct result of being in space, destroying 54% more red blood cells than they would on Earth.

Being in space destroys astronauts red blood cells, new study shows | TweakTown

Space anemia is tied to being in the void and can stick around awhile.Space anemia is tied to being in the void and can stick around awhile.

We don’t know why, but being in space causes us to destroy our blood | Ars Technica

Space anemia is tied to being in the void and can stick around awhile.Space anemia is tied to being in the void and can stick around awhile.

We don’t know why, but being in space causes us to destroy our blood | Ars Technica

The world-first study found that more than 3 million red blood cells were killed a second in space, compared to just 2 million on Earth.The world-first study found that more than 3 million red blood cells were killed a second in space, compared to just 2 million on Earth.

www.cbsnews.com

Doctors believe anemia sets in because of the fluid shifts within astronauts' bodies that accommodate weightlessness and then again as they re-accommodated to gravity.Doctors believe anemia sets in because of the fluid shifts within astronauts' bodies that accommodate weightlessness and then again as they re-accommodated to gravity.

Astronauts suffer from anemia in space because their bodies destroy a MILLION more red blood cells | Daily Mail Online

www.cnn.com

The next "giant leap" for humans may be a trip to Mars, but having enough oxygen-carrying red blood cells for the journey might present a challenge, new research suggests.The next "giant leap" for humans may be a trip to Mars, but having enough oxygen-carrying red blood cells for the journey might present a challenge, new research suggests.

Anemia in astronauts could be a challenge for space missions | Reuters

World-first study changes what’s known about space anemia. A world-first study has revealed how space travel can cause lower red blood cell counts, known as space anemia. Analysis of 14 astronauts showed their bodies destroyed 54 percent more red blood cells in space than they normally would on Ear

Space Anemia: Being in Space Destroys More Red Blood Cells

The next "giant leap" for humans may be a trip to Mars, but having enough oxygen-carrying red blood cells for the journey might present a challenge, new research suggests.The next "giant leap" for humans may be a trip to Mars, but having enough oxygen-carrying red blood cells for the journey might present a challenge, new research suggests.

www.cbc.ca

People at risk of heart failure, angina and other conditions made worse by anaemia could be prevented from participating in the fledgling space tourism industryPeople at risk of heart failure, angina and other conditions made worse by anaemia could be prevented from participating in the fledgling space tourism industry

Space travel can make you anaemic, making Elon Musk's plan to colonise Mars more difficult than hoped

A world-first study has revealed how space travel can cause lower red blood cell counts, known as space anemia. Analysis of 14 astronauts showed their bodies destroyed 54 percent more red blood cells ...

Being in space destroys more red blood cells