1. Newly discovered type of 'strange metal' could lead to deep insights  EurekAlert
  2. Newly discovered type of 'strange metal' could lead to deep insights  Phys.org
  3. Signatures of a strange metal in a bosonic system  Nature.com
  4. Mystery As Scientists Discover New ‘Strange Metal’ That Behaves In Ways They Can’t Understand  UNILAD
  5. Scientists find ‘strange metal’ that behaves in ways they don’t understand  The Independent
  6. View Full coverage on Google News
A new discovery could help scientists to understand “strange metals,” a class of materials that are related to high-temperature superconductors and share fundamental quantum attributes with black holes.

Newly discovered type of ‘strange metal’ coul | EurekAlert!

Scientists understand quite well how temperature affects electrical conductance in most everyday metals like copper or silver. But in recent years, researchers have turned their attention to a class of ...

Newly discovered type of 'strange metal' could lead to deep insights

Fermi liquid theory forms the basis for our understanding of the majority of metals: their resistivity arises from the scattering of well defined quasiparticles at a rate where, in the low-temperature limit, the inverse of the characteristic time scale is proportional to the square of the temperature. However, various quantum materials1–15—notably high-temperature superconductors1–10—exhibit strange-metallic behaviour with a linear scattering rate in temperature, deviating from this central paradigm. Here we show the unexpected signatures of strange metallicity in a bosonic system for which the quasiparticle concept does not apply. Our nanopatterned YBa2Cu3O7−δ (YBCO) film arrays reveal linear-in-temperature and linear-in-magnetic field resistance over extended temperature and magnetic field ranges. Notably, below the onset temperature at which Cooper pairs form, the low-field magnetoresistance oscillates with a period dictated by the superconducting flux quantum, h/2e (e, electron charge; h, Planck’s constant). Simultaneously, the Hall coefficient drops and vanishes within the measurement resolution with decreasing temperature, indicating that Cooper pairs instead of single electrons dominate the transport process. Moreover, the characteristic time scale τ in this bosonic system follows a scale-invariant relation without an intrinsic energy scale: ħ/τ ≈ a(kBT + γμBB), where ħ is the reduced Planck’s constant, a is of order unity7,8,11,12, kB is Boltzmann’s constant, T is temperature, μB is the Bohr magneton and γ ≈ 2. By extending the reach of strange-metal phenomenology to a bosonic system, our results suggest that there is a fundamental principle governing their transport that transcends particle statistics. Strange metallicity—in particular, resistance that is linear in temperature and magnetic field—is observed in a nanopatterned YBa2Cu3O7−δ bosonic system.Nature - Strange metallicity—in particular, resistance that is linear in temperature and magnetic field—is observed in a nanopatterned YBa2Cu3O7−δ bosonic...

Signatures of a strange metal in a bosonic system | Nature

A ‘strange metal’ has been discovered by scientists with a number of mannerisms they’re scrambling to try and understand. Materials like copper and silver behave in predictable ways, and anyone who took a science class in school can understand how their ability to conduct electricity can change depending on when they’re heated or cooled. However, … A ‘strange metal’ has been discovered by scientists with a number of mannerisms they’re scrambling to try and understand. Materials like copper and silver behave in predictable ways, and anyone who took a science class in school can understand how their ability to conduct electricity can change depending on when they’re heated or cooled. However, …

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Scientists have found a new “strange metal” that behaves in ways they can’t quite understand.Scientists have found a new “strange metal” that behaves in ways they can’t quite understand.

Scientists find ‘strange metal’ that behaves in ways they don’t understand | The Independent